Does Painting Help Your Mental Wellbeing?

Guest post:Francesca Pavis

With the help of certified and trained art therapists, scientists have discovered that art therapy can help people with anxiety and depression by developing a greater sense of self.

What are the immediate benefits of painting?

Art therapy can not only help with self-care, but also help people with some learning difficulties to feel successful! Painting can help to create a greater sense of self-esteem, appreciation and a more positive state of mind. Painting can help to generate positive emotions such as joy, contentment and contentment with one’s own life.

It’s never too late to give painting a go!

It is never too late to start a new hobby, and learning a craft is a fantastic way to improve your mental health and wellbeing. Painting helps to build strong mental health at any age, so it is always worth starting and starting new hobbies.

There are so many benefits as a new artist… painting has helped to build a solid mentality at all ages. Painting helps build strong mental health at any age, but it’s never too late to kick off a new hobby like this.

Is it only painting?

Activities such as art, sculpting, drawing and photography are relaxing and rewarding hobbies that can relieve stress and leave a feeling of mental clarity and peace. Whether through a specially designed art therapy program or simply through creative activities such as journalism or daily drawing, repetitive creative expression brings many benefits to improve mental health.

Whether you choose to engage in physical activity or just look at the great works of others, art can go a long way to strengthening your mental health. Art can significantly benefit your mental wellbeing, this has been proven time and time again with links between mental health lows and lack of creative stimulation.

I would recommend painting to those who are struggling with mental health problems, particularly depression or anxiety disorders. Although not an instant cure or a quick fix, painting could play a part in recovering from this.

Painting is also an act of self-care.

Art and painting promote emotional well-being, as one learns to express oneself better through the medium of art. If you are struggling with mental illness, finding a medium in which to truly express yourself can lift your mood and improve your mental health.

Painting also helps to improve memory performance and is a great way to sharpen the mind not only in terms of creativity but also in terms of memory.

Art is a new way to engage the mind, to open up emotions in a healthy way and to create a good feeling. It has numerous other benefits for your well-being. Painting as a hobby not only makes us better, but also protects our health, awakens joy and secures our brain function for the future. The process of making art is an important part of the process for those who consider themselves artists.

In turn other health benefits can be seen.

Not surprisingly, low stress levels lead to happier and healthier lifestyles and help improve overall mental health. In addition, positive health also promotes creativity and makes the connection between art and mental well-being definitely correlated.

Given the positive qualities of artistic hobbies, it is clear that painting promotes greater mental health in old age. People with creative hobbies (writing, painting, drawing, etc.) have a lower risk of developing memory loss and disease in old age. They also have less chance of developing cognitive difficulties than those who don’t participate in more creative activities such as painting and drawing.

Final words on painting for mental wellbeing.

Art is particularly beneficial for mental health because it stimulates the mind and has a positive effect on the brain. It also has social and physical benefits that help promote your overall well being. On top of this, you may find you are a natural artist in the making! Happy painting.


About Author: Francesca Pavis

Hello, I’m Francesca, an acrylic painter based in Manchester, UK and the owner of Pavis Paints. Feel free to take a look around! I also run a shop and am open to commissions if you like my style of work ✯

© Anjali Sharma, Positive Side Of The Coin

59 thoughts on “Does Painting Help Your Mental Wellbeing?

  1. This is absolutely wonderful. I love how optimistic and flamboyant the content here is. Truly something I enjoyed reading. If I could, I would paint my way through life.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s really amazing painting. I thought It is beautiful island.
    I am one of the new blogger here,
    First time glad to read your blog.
    Keep rocking.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Could not agree more. I will go further and say not only painting, but any activity done with hands, is slow, requires focus, and results producing something, is therapeutic. Even cooking, if you don’t do it as a matter of routine. Skills like embroidery and crochet. Our forefathers had a place for such activities in their daily lives.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. I resonated with this line, “Activities such as art, sculpting, drawing and photography are relaxing and rewarding hobbies that can relieve stress and leave a feeling of mental clarity and peace.” This year, I’ve been making more time for watercoloring in my free time, and I totally agree that it’s relaxing. I appreciate you for sharing how painting positively affects our wellbeing!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. My dad is insane. He is still holding out on the mountain in debt at the moment. However, he is a wonderful artist. I have tried to get him help and hope he doesn’t end up off a cliff near his home. I’m hoping he eventually goes to a mental institution. He would be the star of art therapy. I’m not judging him for his illness. He projects onto me. I inherited schizophrenia from that side and have had it since I was a kid, too. It’s obviously genetic. I do not like painting but have written a lot. It has helped me to think logically. Also, I’ve noticed that female hormones protect the brain and that we don’t present the same way as males do.

    Liked by 5 people

      1. I’m worried about my stepmom who has HIV, not my dad. I don’t love him. It’s so pathetic that I can’t justify killing or harming him, even if it means he finally bones me (he never touched me growing up, but has “issues” around liking me, as he also talks about my brother’s (age 12) penis size) or kills me as he called me for a long time telling me he wanted to take me to the good Lord with him. I don’t talk to him anymore. There’s no way to help May, my stepmom, who is trapped needing medicine, as she’s from a poor village in Thailand, but dad’s probably not going to find a job ever again. He doesn’t understand this. I’ve turned him into the cops multiple times, but they won’t do anything about his mental health and he deflects onto me. He is manipulative and knows what to say. Meanwhile, I’ve been thrown onto several wards/psychiatric units for little things. No, dad and I don’t live near each other. He has no power over me.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. I am so sorry for all this what’s going on in your life. I am glad that you decided to take control of your life in your hands. All the best and I will pray that you come out of this situation soon. Take care 💗.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Thanks for your regards. When you grow up with people like this, it’s normal. I could go on for hours. I laugh about it. I care about my stepmom, however, as she is a really good person.

            Liked by 3 people

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